All Creatures Veterinary Hospital  4549 Highway 62 West                

Mountain Home, AR 72653              (870)425-5175                                            

© 1995 by All Creatures Veterinary Hospital

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All Creatures Lakeside

5419 Highway 62 East

Mountain Home, AR 72653

(870)492-2058

Patient Payment Plans

Lab Work and Diagnostics

Click on any of the following links to read more about the diagnostics we provide and special instructions prior to testing. 

Canine

Feline

Equine

Herd

 

ACTH

The ACTH Test requires a sample of blood that must be drawn 2 hours after a hormone injection is given. This test is performed to diagnose Cushings or Adison's disease and is also used to monitor patients who have been diagnosed with Cushings and are currently on Trilostane (Vetoryl) medication. 

INSTRUCTIONS PRIOR TO TEST:

DOGS CURRENTLY TAKING TRILOSTANE (VETORYL): Feed and give medication at the normal time. The ACTH hormone injection must be given 4 hours after the medication was given. The blood must be drawn 2 hours after this injection is given. Your pet can go home after we draw the blood and the veterinarian will call you with the results of the test 2-3 business days later. 

DOGS NOT CURRENTLY TAKING TRILOSTANE (VETORYL): Feed and give any medication that your pet is regularly on at the normal time. The first sample of blood will be drawn at the time your pet is dropped off at the clinic. The ACTH hormone injection will then be given, and the second sample of blood will be drawer 2 hours after the injection. Your pet can go home after we draw the second sample of blood and the veterinarian will call you with the results of the test 2-3 business days later. 

 
 

Bile Acids

The Bile Acids test requires two blood samples and is performed to diagnose liver malfunction but does not indicate the nature of the abnormality or whether the problem is reversible or permanent

INSTRUCTIONS PRIOR TO TEST: 

DOGS AND CATS: Your pet must fast (no food, but water is okay) for 12 hours before the first blood draw. The first blood sample will be drawn after the 12 hour fasting period. A high-fat meal will then be fed to your pet to stimulate gallbladder contraction and the second blood sample will be drawn 2 hours after the meal. Your pet can go home after we draw the second sample of blood and the veterinarian will call you with the results of the test 2-3 business days later. 

Coggins

**Coggins test is a blood test that detects antibodies to the disease Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA). This is a virus that can cause affected horses (or donkeys) to have fevers, anemia (low red blood cell count), edema (stocking up), or weight loss/muscle wasting. Some horses recover quickly from the symptoms, which may be nothing more than a fever for <24 hours. There is no vaccine for EIA and there is no treatment.

HORSES: There is no special instructions before the blood draw. Click here to submit the Coggins paperwork electronically that is required before the scheduled appointment. Our office will call with the results within 7-10 business days. For rush services, please call our office.

 

Complete Blood Count (CBC)

CATS, DOGS, HORSES, AND HERD ANIMALS: A complete blood count is an in-house blood test used to determine the number of red and white blood cells and platelets. This test can be used to diagnose a wide range of health concerns from anemia to cancer. A CBC is vital to monitoring patients with specific diseases. There are no special instructions required prior to performing this test. 

 

Fecal Egg Count

A fresh stool sample is required to perform a fecal exam to look for intestinal parasites. We recommend this test be conducted annually on horses and goats. We perform fecal exams in-house but sending a sample to an outside lab is sometimes necessary to look for intestinal parasites that cannot be detected with our equipment.

This test looks for the eggs of roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, tapeworms, coccidia, giardia, lungworms, and even fat content! Most intestinal parasites hang out in the GI tract of your pet, therefore a fecal exam is performed by using a microscope to search for eggs and is the most accurate way of detecting parasites. A negative fecal exam does not necessarily mean your pet is parasite free but instead means that no parasites were seen in that sample.

 

This test differs from a fecal flotation (fecal exam used for small animals) because it not only detects what intestinal parasites an animal has, but the amount of parasites. An animal is classified as a low, medium, or high contaminator based on the amount of parasites. The veterinarian will make deworming recommendations based off the result to avoid over deworming a herd which leads to resistance. 

INSTRUCTIONS PRIOR TO TEST

HORSES, GOATS, AND SHEEP: If your animal is coming in for an appointment for a check-up or to be seen for not feeling well, or if you just need to drop a sample by for regular testing, please bring in a fresh sample that was collected within the last 24 hours. If you've collected a sample, but have a few hours or more before coming to the clinic, then please refrigerate the sample. Only a small amount of poop is needed to run a fecal exam (about the size of two sugar cubes). You can use a tupperware container or a bag to store the sample. 

 

Fecal Exam for Intestinal Parasites

A fresh stool sample is required to perform a fecal exam to look for intestinal parasites. We recommend this test be conducted 2 to 4 times during the first year of life and annually in adults. We perform fecal exams in-house but sending a sample to an outside lab is sometimes necessary to look for intestinal parasites that cannot be detected with our equipment. 

This test looks for the eggs of roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, tapeworms (see below for more info about tapeworms), coccidia, giardia, lungworms, and even fat content! Most intestinal parasites hang out in the GI tract of your pet, therefore a fecal exam is performed by using a microscope to search for eggs and is the most accurate way of detecting parasites. A negative fecal exam does not necessarily mean your pet is parasite free but instead means that no parasites were seen in that sample. 

TAPEWORMS: This intestinal parasite is not typically detected in a fecal exam because tapeworms do not shed eggs like most other intestinal parasites. Tapeworms are most often noticed by owners who may spot them where their pet sleeps or on their pet's bottom. If tapeworms are not seen on a fecal exam but you have seen evidence of them, treatment is recommended. 

INSTRUCTIONS PRIOR TO TEST

DOGS: If your dog is coming in for an appointment for a check-up or to be seen for not feeling well, or if you just need to drop a sample by for regular testing, please bring in a fresh sample that was collected within the last 24 hours. If you've collected a sample, but have a few hours or more before coming to the clinic, then please refrigerate the sample. Only a small amount of poop is needed to run a fecal exam (about the size of two sugar cubes). You can use a tupperware container or a bag to store the sample. If you are unable to collect a sample, the veterinarian can collect a sample while your dog is here. 

CATS: If your cat is coming in for an appointment for a check-up or to be seen for not feeling well, or if you just need to drop a sample by for regular testing, please bring in a fresh sample that was collected within the last 24 hours. If you've collected a sample, but have a few hours or more before coming to the clinic, then please refrigerate the sample. It is okay if the sample has kitty litter on it! Only a small amount of poop is needed to run a fecal exam (about the size of two sugar cubes). You can use a tupperware container or a bag to store the sample. If you are unable to collect a sample, the veterinarian can collect a sample while your cat is here. Intestinal parasites in cats can be harder to detect because they shed less, therefore, if your cat regularly goes outside then we recommend an annual fecal exam and deworming. 

 

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus/ Leukemia/ Heartworm Test

Feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and heartworm disease are untreatable diseases that can in many cases be fatal. FELV causes suppression of the immune system and can cause cancer. It is spread by saliva and can also be spread from mother to young. 

Like FeLV, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is also contagious among cats, and a cat can be infected with FIV for many years without showing any clinical signs of illness. Although FIV is not contagious to humans, FIV has some similarities to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

Heartworm disease is a serious and potentially fatal infection in cats. It is caused by parasitic worms (heartworms) living in the major blood vessels of the lungs and, occasionally, in the heart. These worms are transmitted (as microscopic larvae) through the bite of an infected mosquito. A cat can be infected with heartworms and show no symptoms of the disease but can die suddenly.

CATS: This is an in-house blood test that takes about 15 minutes. There are no special instructions required prior to testing. Kittens or cats being introduced into the home should be tested for FeLV and FIV, especially if they are ill. Kittens whose mothers were infected with FIV may test positive when they are very young but test negative later as the antibodies they received while nursing from their mother wear off. Some veterinarians, therefore, recommend retesting young kittens when they are older (for example, at 6 months of age) to verify whether they are still positive. Some cats may be FeLV-negative at one point and test positive later as the virus progresses through various stages in the body.

To learn more about these diseases, their symptoms, testing, and treatment, you can visit http://www.vetstreet.com/care/feline-leukemia-feline-immunodeficiency-virus-and-heartworm-testing

 
 

Fructosamine

This in house blood test requires a small sample of blood to determine if the insulin being given is the adequate dose to maintain a diabetic patient's blood glucose. This test is typically performed on feline diabetic patients because other types glucose tests for cats are often influenced by their stress level. The results of a fructosamine test will reflect your pet's average blood sugars over the past two weeks. 

INSTRUCTIONS PRIOR TO TEST:

CATS: There are no special instructions required prior to testing. Feed and give insulin as normal the morning of the test. The blood may be drawn anytime of the day. 

Glucose Curve

The glucose curve requires a sample of blood that must be drawn every 2 hours to determine if the insulin being given is the adequate dose to maintain a diabetic patient's blood glucose. The blood test will only be accurate if the blood is drawn within the specified time period after the insulin and food was given at the regular routine time.

INSTRUCTIONS PRIOR TO TEST:

Dogs: Feed and give insulin as normal the morning of the test. If insulin and/or food is given later than your pet's scheduled appointment, then it will be administered in hospital at time that is normal for your pet. If your pet is staying the night, please bring your pet's food and insulin. Your pet will be scheduled a time of discharge with the veterinarian typically after 4:00 p.m. to discuss the results.  

 

Heartworm

DOGS: Puppies should be started on preventives as early as possible, and no later than 8 weeks of age. Puppies started on a heartworm preventive after 8 weeks of age should be tested 6 months after the initial dose, then annually thereafter. Before starting heartworm preventatives on dogs 7 months of age or older, heartworm testing should be performed immediately, then 6 months later, and annually thereafter.

HEARTWORM TESTING FOR DOGS THAT MISSED A DOSE OF HEARTWORM MEDICATION OR WHEN CHANGING MEDICATION

In these instances, the dog should be tested to determine heartworm status prior to starting or changing products. A positive test indicates pre-existing infection. The dog should always be retested 6 months later, and if positive, the infection was most likely acquired before starting or resuming preventive therapy. In rare instances, however, existing infections might still be missed. Heartworm testing should be performed on the one year anniversary date of the initial test and annually thereafter.

CATS: Preventives should be started in kittens at 8 weeks of age and be administered to all cats in heartworm-endemic areas such as Arkansas. An initial heartworm test is recommended but not required for feline patients and annual heartworm testing in felines is not necessary. Heartworm disease is extremely hard to detect in cats even with the tests that are available, therefore, prevention is key. 

To learn more about heartworm disease in cats and dogs, visit https://www.heartwormsociety.org/ 

 
 

NSAID Panel

DOGS AND CATS: This blood panel is used to monitor patients who are taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications and ensure the safety of these patients by checking several kidney and liver values (ALKP, ALT, AST, BUN, CREA). This blood test may also be used to monitor patients who have chronic renal or hepatic deficiencies. There are no special instructions required prior to testing. 

 

Pancreatitis (cPL) (fPL)

Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas that is most commonly caused by a fatty meal but the cause can also be unknown. The most common symptoms associated with pancreatitis is vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, and dehydration. 

DOGS AND CATS: This in-house blood test requires a small blood sample and there are no special instructions required prior to testing. 

 

Phenobarbital Monitoring

This in-house blood test requires a small blood sample to test the levels of phenobarbital in a patient's blood that is currently taking phenobarbital medication for seizures. Depending on if the levels are high, normal, or low along with monitoring for liver abnormalities will help the doctor determine the best dose for your pet. 

DOGS: Give the phenobarbital medication the day of the test as normal. There are no special instructions required prior to testing. 

Pre-Surgical Screen (Chem10/Lytes/CBC)

If your pet is having dental work or surgery, it’s important to run blood work prior to anesthesia primarily to ensure your pet can properly process and eliminate anesthesia. Preanesthetic testing helps us understand whether your pet’s vital organs are functioning properly, which can help us create an individualized anesthetic plan for your pet and avoid potential complications during surgery. 

 

Certain conditions are especially risky for pets under anesthesia, and preanesthetic blood work can show if there are any hidden or undetected health problems. Regardless of why your pet is being anesthetized, preanesthetic testing establishes a baseline for their individual health, which is helpful for future reference.

Kidney results indicate whether your pet is properly hydrated (electrolytes). Results will also reveal whether they have kidney or liver disease, results can also tell us if your pet has abnormal blood sugar, electrolyte imbalance, metabolic disease and more. A complete blood count (CBC) shows if your pet has underlying stress, inflammation, inability to fight infection, and/or low platelet count. The CBC will also indicate if your pet is anemic or has a potential bleeding problem.

CATS, DOGS, HORSES, AND HERD ANIMAL: This in-house blood test requires a small blood sample and although it is not required that your pet fast prior to the blood draw, fasted samples ensure more accurate testing and interpretation of results. Make sure your pet has not eaten anything (fasted) at least 12 hours before surgery.

 
 

Thyroid Test (T4)

DOGS: Give the thyroid medication as directed by your veterinarian the morning of the test. The thyroid test requires a sample of blood that must be drawn 4-6 hours after the thyroid medication was given. The blood test will only be accurate if the blood is drawn within the specified time period to show if the thyroid is being maintained at the therapeutic level. 

CATS: Give the thyroid medication as directed by your veterinarian the morning of the test. There are no stipulations to when the blood must be drawn in feline patients as there are in our canine patients. The blood test will show if the thyroid is being maintained at the therapeutic level. 

Wellness (Chem17/Lytes/CBC)

This in-house blood panel is our most in-depth chemistry panel with a CBC. This test reads all of the same values as the pre-surgical screen and more. In some cases, this panel will be recommended for certain patients before anesthesia. 

 

Kidney results indicate whether your pet is properly hydrated (electrolytes). Results will also reveal whether they have kidney or liver disease, results can also tell us if your pet has abnormal blood sugar, electrolyte imbalance, metabolic disease and more. A complete blood count (CBC) shows if your pet has underlying stress, inflammation, inability to fight infection, and/or low platelet count. The CBC will also indicate if your pet is anemic or has a potential bleeding problem.

SICK PETS: Blood work provides you with a valuable picture of your pet’s health and is often the first step when pets are brought in to a clinic because they are sick or in an emergency situation. It helps the veterinary staff make immediate decisions, so they can quickly help your pet.

PREVENTATIVE CARE: Because the signs that your pet is sick are not always obvious, preventive care testing is often recommended as part of your pet’s annual exam. Preventive care screening not only uncovers disease before it’s too late, but can also help you avoid significant medical expenses and risks to your pet’s health.

MEDICATION MONITORING: Some medications can have side effects. Periodic blood work while your pet is being treated can find these problems early and allow your veterinarian to make necessary changes. With other medications, blood tests are needed to ensure that the dosage is appropriate.

CATS, DOGS, HORSES, AND HERD ANIMAL: This in-house blood test requires a small blood sample and although it is not required that your pet fast prior to the blood draw, fasted samples ensure more accurate testing and interpretation of results. Make sure your pet has not eaten anything (fasted) at least 12 hours before surgery.